Some great clips of Prince

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I’ve been a big fan of Prince ever since When Doves Cry was a hit back in 1984. I took it with me on a trip to India and it became the sound track for the holiday. I’ve got 15 of his albums and I was lucky enough to see him live, twice – the second time I was just a few rows from the front. That said, over the last few years I’ve not listened to his music so much.  But that all changed since he died and I’ve spent an unholy amount of time on youtube listening to his performances. Here’s some of […]

Review of “Gweilo: A Memoir of a Hong Kong Childhood” – Martin Booth

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Just finished reading Martin Booth’s autobiographic book, the third of the Gweilo canon I’ve read these past few months. The three books couldn’t be more different. John Lanchester’s novel Fragrant Harbour covers the period between the end of the first world war and the turn of this century. He skilfully weaves three narrators and three narratives into an intergenerational saga.  James Clavell’s Taipan is a swashbuckling story of  an early Victorian privateer who outwits mandarins, pirates and business rivals to found an enduring business dynasty that loosely based on  the Jardine story. Gweilo is set in the two-year stretch of time between 1952 and […]

Review of “Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future” – Paul Mason

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Mason is best known to Brits as a broadcast journalist on BBC and Channel 4, and as a professional northerner-Trotskyist purveyor of political balance on the interview couch. He has drawn on an eclectic mix of economists, psychologists and futurologists to substantiate his obituary of neo-liberalism. The book’s key argument is that several megatrends make it likely and desirable for traditional capitalism to collapse. Markets are becoming increasingly irrelevant in many of their key functions like the allocation of capital, price discovery and matching supply and demand. In a world of quantitative easing and dematerialisation of production there is excess […]

Netflix and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Tiger: Sword of Destiny

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Unlike most of its reviewers I watched the second instalment of the Sword and Calligraphy epic last week and loved it. It’s shorn of the original director Ang Lee and star Hong Konger Chow Yun-fat, but gorgeous Michelle Yeoh is in. If you like fighting scenes that wouldn’t look out of place in the Royal Ballet or Cirque du Soleil and a cast of chivalrous warrior-clerics you’ll enjoy it too. My favourite scene was a fight on a frozen lake. The thought of being trapped under ice scares me silly but as these guys keep on with their pirouetting flying side kicks […]